Springdale, Arkansas

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Community Blood Center of the Ozarks

While hanging out in the Fayetteville, Arkansas area I saw a call for blood donations in neighboring Springdale. To tie together separate trips, the Community Blood Center in Springdale was instrumental in supplying blood to the residents of nearby Joplin, Missouri after they were hit by the tornado of 2011.

You might not ever know who is going to need your blood, but it’s safe to say somebody will, and it’s better to have it ready to go when disaster hits.

More about Community Blood Center of the Ozarks (from their website):

Since 1995, Community Blood Center of the Ozarks has met the transfusion needs of patients throughout the Ozarks. Each day, we deliver more than 250 blood donations to meet the needs of patients in the thirty-eight hospitals supplied by CBCO.  Your donations and volunteer work make that happen. You save lives.

Community Blood Center of the Ozarks collects blood at Donor Centers located in Springfield, Mo. Joplin, Mo., Springdale, Ark., and Bentonville, Ark., and hosts many more mobile blood drives throughout the region each day.Hospitals in southwest Missouri, northwest Arkansas and southeast Kansas rely on Community Blood Center of the Ozarks donors. All blood and blood products transfused to patients in these hospitals come from CBCO donors.

Community Blood Center of the Ozarks is a not-for-profit organization and is committed to providing the highest quality blood and blood products to our area hospitals at the lowest possible cost.

We are part of an innovative awards program – the Life Points program – that awards donors for their efforts.

CARE Partnership on the web:
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Norwalk, Connecticut

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Red Cross of Fairfield County

One of the things I resolved to do this year in conjunction with the Be Local Everywhere project was to give blood, when able, wherever I am. Back in March I donated in Clark County, Washington. By the time I got to Connecticut, the requisite 58 day waiting period between donations had passed.

And that’s how I found myself (along with my good friend, Aegina) at the Red Cross of Fairfield County in Norwalk, Connecticut. I’ve given blood plenty of times (though not as much as I should have, especially in the last few years), but I have never had a more skilled Red Cross worker than my new friend, Troy, in Norwalk. Everybody should go visit her!

More about the Red Cross (from their website):

Each day, thousands of people – people just like you – provide compassionate care to those in need. Our network of generous donors, volunteers and employees share a mission of preventing and relieving suffering, here at home and around the world.

We roll up our sleeves and donate time, money and blood. We learn or teach life-saving skills so our communities can be better prepared when the need arises. We do this every day because the Red Cross is needed – every day.

Red Cross on the web:
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Vancouver, Washington

Red Cross of Clark County, WA

The Red Cross

Many years ago I was a fairly regular blood donor. For whatever reason I stopped going. Occasionally, I’d tell myself to go, but didn’t.

But I also know that donating blood is a pretty important and simple thing most of us can do. It takes less than an hour, the pain isn’t really significant, and someday it might be somebody close to us who desperately needs blood.

I scheduled an appointment with the Clark County (Washington) Red Cross, made the brief drive from Portland, OR to Vancouver, WA, and donated. It was as smooth and easy as I remember (and I got free cookies!).

More about the Red Cross (from their website):

Each day, thousands of people – people just like you – provide compassionate care to those in need. Our network of generous donors, volunteers and employees share a mission of preventing and relieving suffering, here at home and around the world.

We roll up our sleeves and donate time, money and blood. We learn or teach life-saving skills so our communities can be better prepared when the need arises. We do this every day because the Red Cross is needed – every day.

Here are some statistics from the Red Cross.

Every two seconds someone in the U.S. needs blood.

More than 41,000 blood donations are needed every day.

A total of 30 million blood components are transfused each year in the U.S.

The average red blood cell transfusion is approximately 3 pints.

The blood type most often requested by hospitals is Type O.

The blood used in an emergency is already on the shelves before the event occurs.

Sickle cell disease affects more than 70,000 people in the U.S. About 1,000 babies are born with the disease each year. Sickle cell patients can require frequent blood transfusions throughout their lives.

More than 1.6 million people were diagnosed with cancer last year. Many of them will need blood, sometimes daily, during their chemotherapy treatment.

A single car accident victim can require as many as 100 pints of blood.

Red Cross on the web:
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